#eyes

Age-Related Macular Degeneration

Age-Related Macular degeneration is the number one cause of vision loss facing 10 million Americans today. Which is more than cataracts and glaucoma combined. Currently, this disease affects many people living in Beverly Hills, Los Angeles, and throughout Southern California. The disease is caused by deterioration of the central part of the retina. This area, called the macula, lies at the back of the eye and records the images we see. These images are sent through the optic nerve to then be interpreted by the brain. Although this disease is currently incurable there are ways to slow its effects.

Those highest at risk for age-related macular degeneration are over the age of 55, smokers, or those with a family history of AMD. In order to slow the effects of AMD, it is advised to avoid smoking and live a healthy lifestyle. AMD by itself does not lead to complete blindness, with no ability to see. However, the loss of central vision in AMD can interfere with simple everyday activities, such as the ability to see faces, drive, read, write, or do close work, such as cooking or fixing things around the house. It is possible to lower the risk of AMD or slow its progression by eating healthy, exercising, and protecting your eyes from ultraviolet light. For more information about AMD visit your local ophthalmologist

3 Common Workplace Eye Injuries – And How to Avoid Them

Workplace eye injuries are more common than you might think. According to the Center for Disease Control, “Each day about 2000 U.S. workers sustain a job-related eye injury that requires medical treatment”. These injuries can occur at construction sites, movie sets, manufacturing plants, and a number of other skilled labor workplaces. Many of these injuries can be easily avoided through simple safety precautions and the use of safety glasses.

Eye Injuries in the workplace can include:

  1. Flying Particles: The most common workplace eye injury is the result of small particles striking or scraping the eye.
  2. Tools: These penetration injuries can come from nails, wood, metal shards, etc. These objects can puncture the eye, sometimes resulting in permanent loss of vision.
  3. Chemicals: Industrial cleaning products and chemicals frequently cause damage to both eyes.

In order to prevent workplace eye injuries, it is necessary to take a few simple safety precautions. First protective eyewear should be worn during all potentially hazardous work. Dr. James Khodabakhsh at the Beverly Hills Institute of Ophthalmology recommends using protective eyewear that is ANSI rated, signified by a Z87 marking on the lens. Additional care should be taken to reduce the risk of flying debris using safeguards such a protective shield and by keeping workspaces clean. If an incident should occur it is smart to have contact information for both the local emergency room and a trustworthy ophthalmologist on hand.